HealthSex & Love

Sexually Transmitted Diseases – Part 1

Sexually Transmitted Diseases - Part 1

Sexually Transmitted Diseases – Part 1

Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs), also called Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI), are referred to as infections or diseases that are transmitted from person to person during sexual activity, although some may be caused by transfer of body fluids of an infected person. More than twenty types of STDs annually infect millions of men and women. These diseases can be caused by viruses, bacteria or parasites.

All people with STIs should take the necessary precautions to prevent their infection from being transmitted to others (such as using condoms during sexual activities) and to make sure their sexual partner is aware of the disease so that they can also be examined.

 

Common viral sexually transmitted diseases

The three most common diseases in this category are AIDS, genital herpes, and genital warts.

1. AIDS

AIDS is transmitted by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus). It attacks white blood cells, destroys the body’s defense against infections, and makes it susceptible to other infections that eventually lead to AIDS.
At the onset of infection, the person may have no symptoms. Some people develop flu-like illness for two to six weeks after being infected. Early signs and symptoms of infection include fever, headache, sore throat, fatigue, skin rashes and swollen lymph nodes.

These signs and symptoms disappear within a week to a month and are unfortunately confused with other viral infections. As the virus proliferates and destroys immune cells, mild or chronic infections are caused by symptoms of lymph node swelling, weight loss, diarrhea, fever, cough and shortness of breath. Signs and symptoms of the last stage include persistent fatigue, severe chills or high fever for several weeks, severe night sweats, lymph nodes swelling, persistent headache, chronic diarrhea, and opportunistic and abnormal infections. Today, there are drugs that can partially control or delay the progression of the disease.

 

2. Herpes

Genital herpes is caused by the Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV2), which enters the body or mucous membrane from a small hole in the skin and is highly contagious. Signs and symptoms of genital herpes include small bumps, blisters or open sores. In women, ulcers can occur in the external genital area, inside the vagina, buttocks, anus, or cervix. In men, these ulcers occur on the penis, scrotum, buttocks, anus, or inside the urethra. These ulcers cause painful urination. During the first stage, flu-like symptoms such as headaches, muscle aches and fever may occur along with swollen lymph nodes in the groin. In some cases, the infection can be active and contagious even when there is no wound.

These viruses infect the nerve cells and may dormant at the end of the nerve cells and sometimes develop as a result of stimuli such as nerve pressures and stress. The virus then returns to the skin through the long nerve cells, where it replicates and produces herpes. There is no cure for herpes, only some medications can control it. Therefore, the patient will periodically suffer from the spread of these wounds throughout his life.

 

3. Genital Wart

Genital wart is transmitted by a virus called Human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections. The virus is transmitted from one person to another by sex or skin contact. Genital warts are initially small, stiff and painless and may occur in the vagina or penis as well as around the anus. If left untreated in the early stages, they may grow to look much bigger.

Some HPV infections can lead to cancers such as oral cancer, cervical cancer, penile cancer, and gastric cancer. These lesions may be treated with an ointment that is applied to the lesion. Other treatments, including freezing, are performed by your doctor. Surgery is sometimes required to remove large warts.

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