A defecating proctogram is a test where you’re given an enema of a thick liquid that can be seen with an X-ray. Your provider will use a special video X-ray to record the movement of your muscles as you attempt to push the liquid out of the rectum. This will help to show how well you are able to pass a bowel movement or any other causes for pelvic floor dysfunction. This test is not painful.

Pelvic floor dysfunction is a common condition where you’re unable to correctly relax and coordinate the muscles in your pelvic floor to urinate or to have a bowel movement. If you’re a woman, you may also feel pain during sex, and if you’re a man you may have problems having or keeping an erection (erectile dysfunction or ED). Your pelvic floor is a group of muscles found in the floor (the base) of your pelvis (the bottom of your torso).
By definition, postpartum pelvic floor dysfunction only affects women who have given birth, though pregnancy rather than birth or birth method is thought to be the cause. A study of 184 first-time mothers who delivered by Caesarean section and 100 who delivered vaginally found that there was no significant difference in the prevalence of symptoms 10 months following delivery, suggesting that pregnancy is the cause of incontinence for many women irrespective of their mode of delivery. The study also suggested that the changes which occur to the properties of collagen and other connective tissues during pregnancy may affect pelvic floor function.[7]
Thank you Dr. Northrup for sharing great information about pelvic floor dysfunction. I am a physical therapist and board-certified women’s clinical specialist. I’ve been practicing pelvic physical therapy since 1999. Over the years I have realized that we as women to not have basic information to take care of our bodies and never discuss the ‘secret’ pelvic area. I have such a passion for bringing this information forward that I wrote a book Pelvic Zone Coach, Every Wonan’s Guide To Pelvic Health and Sexual Vitality (available on Amazon).
Although many centers are familiar with retraining techniques to improve pelvic floor dysfunction, few have the multidisciplinary expertise to teach patients with constipation how to appropriately coordinate abdominal and pelvic floor muscles during defecation, and how to use bowel management techniques, along with behavior modification, to relieve symptoms. Because pelvic floor dysfunction can be associated with psychological, sexual or physical abuse and other life stressors, psychological counseling is often included in the evaluation process.
Pelvic floor dysfunction is an umbrella term for a variety of disorders that occur when pelvic floor muscles and ligaments are impaired. Although this condition predominantly affects females, up to 16% of males suffer as well.[1] Symptoms include pelvic pain, pressure, pain during sex, incontinence, incomplete emptying of feces, and visible organ protrusion.[2] Tissues surrounding the pelvic organs may have increased or decreased sensitivity or irritation resulting in pelvic pain. Underlying causes of pelvic pain are often difficult to determine.[3] The condition affects up to 50% of women who have given birth.[4]
Visceral mobilization restores movement to the viscera or organs. As elucidated earlier in our blog, the viscera can affect a host of things even including how well the abdominal muscles reunite following pregnancy or any abdominal surgery. Visceral mobilization aids in relieving constipation/IBS symptoms, bladder symptoms, digestive issues like reflux, as well as sexual pain. Visceral mobilization can facilitate blood supply to aid in their function, allow organs to do their job by ensuring they have the mobility to move in the way they are required to perform their function, and to allow them to reside in the correct place in their body cavity. Evidence is beginning to emerge to demonstrate how visceral mobilization can even aid in fertility problems.

If that’s part of your treatment protocol as determined by your therapist, she may use one finger to stretch and mobilize the pelvic floor muscles, explains Tadros. While it may seem like some patients would balk at this, “I find that patients are so desperate for help, they’re more than okay with having it done. We don’t use a speculum or stirrups. This isn’t invasive, it’s designed to keep someone as comfortable as possible,” she adds.
I have been on this earth almost eighty years, no meds, and have not had these symptoms–yet. I had 5 pregnancies, and one episiotomy birthing one large baby, no hysterectomy. I am not overweight nor do I have a flat butt. Here are some things I’ve done over the years and now am wondering if it may have helped. I don’t know if this was developing core muscles, but when I was a kid, and through most of my life, when I went to bed I would hold my stomach in until I went to sleep. Odd, I know, but I have never had back problems. A strong stomach keeps your back strong. I garden, and have always done squats, still can, although lately I squat without thinking about it and notice it’s less easy to get back up. By doing most things my self I get plenty of exercise and I walk daily. Exercise and diet helps constipation problems. I think as we get older we don’t empty our bladder fully. If you have to lean forward, to the sides, or back or bounce a little, do it. And, true confession, I have a tiny extra bathroom where I can place my feet on the wall–works great for a Squatty Potty. Lastly, keep having orgasms.
The “prescription plan” for tight and weak muscles is different than loose and weak. I recommend going to a Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist (do a google search) or Doctor specializing in Pelvic Floor issues (Most OB/GYNs are NOT knowledgeable of this issue) to get a proper diagnosis. Otherwise, you might do the wrong thing for your condition and make it worse.
Try Biofeedback. Biofeedback can help you learn how to strengthen or relax your pelvic floor muscles. Using special sensors that track your pelvic floor muscle function, you can learn how to activate the correct muscles to keep your pelvic floor toned. This is typically done in an office setting by a nurse or trained therapist. The sessions are usually about an hour. You sit in a comfortable chair with your clothes on after the sensors have been put in place – usually one on your abdomen and the other in your anal canal. The sensors measure the electrical activity of your pelvic floor muscles – especially the ones that control bladder and bowel function – while you contract and release the muscles. There are also home biofeedback devices you can purchase, but you should still have a pelvic floor assessment by a professional before using.
When some or all of these structures of the pelvic floor are not functioning properly, they can cause a multitude of different symptoms. People who are suffering from bowel, bladder, and or sexual problems, as well as those who are suffering from pain in the pelvis, upper legs, abdomen or buttocks most likely have pelvic floor impairments contributing to their pain.
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